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Threat Assessment: Perils Are Pointing To The Possibility Of Heartbreaking Losses

By | Current Affairs and ETFs, Energy ETFs, ETF Philosophy, ETF Strategy, Popular Posts, Real Estate ETFs, Special Sectors ETFs, Technology ETFs, US Markets and ETFs | No Comments

Stocks rocketed to all-time highs between October 1990 and March of 2000 to register the longest bull market ever (9 years, 5 months). No matter how ridiculous the price-per-stock share – no matter the mindlessness associated with owning U.S. tech stocks at 65 times trailing profits (rather than 15) – the popular view had been that the Internet’s “New Economy” had changed the rules of the game. Unfortunately, it hadn’t. The Nasdaq 100 ETF (QQQ) gave up 80% of its…

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Predictions: 3 Things That Will NOT Happen in 2017

By | Currency ETFs, Current Affairs and ETFs, ETF Philosophy, ETF Strategy, Popular Posts, US Markets and ETFs | No Comments

Media personalities love to play the prediction game, particularly in January. Where will the S&P 500 wind up at year’s end? What will happen to interest rates? And after Mariah Carey’s infamous New Year’s Eve non-performance, which celebrity will have the next public meltdown? I enjoy the prognostication pastime as much as any individual. It helps to clarify what matters to me as an investor (as well as what doesn’t). In particular, no matter what happens to the world at…

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Pro-Business Tax Cuts And Fiscal Stimulus Will Not ‘Trump’ Tighter Financial Conditions

By | Asia ETFs, Bond ETFs, Current Affairs and ETFs, ETF Philosophy, ETF Strategy, Global ETFs, International ETFs, Large Cap ETFs, Popular Posts, Small Cap ETFs, US Markets and ETFs | No Comments

What is GDP per capita? It is the value of all goods and services produced in an economy divided by the number of people living in it. Why is it important? It is one of the premier ways to identify both the comfort level of a country’s citizens at a given moment in time as well as the well-being of citizens over time. At the present moment, people living in the United States have it pretty good. Not quite as…

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Do Stock Sellers Understand Something That Recent Buyers Do Not?

By | Biotechnology ETFs, Current Affairs and ETFs, Emerging Market ETFs, ETF Philosophy, ETF Strategy, Europe ETFs, International ETFs, Large Cap ETFs, Popular Posts, Small Cap ETFs, US Markets and ETFs | No Comments

Is the stock market going up because there are more buyers than sellers? No. There are a fixed number of shares in the marketplace. For every buyer of a share, there needs to be a seller of the asset. In fact, a transaction cannot occur without each participant – each buyer and each seller – playing a role in a trade. So why is the U.S. stock market relentlessly powering ahead? Shareholding sellers are only willing to accommodate eager buyers…

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Bought the Super-Charged Growth Rumor? Prepare to Sell the Mediocre Growth News

By | Currency ETFs, Current Affairs and ETFs, Emerging Market ETFs, ETF Philosophy, ETF Strategy, International ETFs, Large Cap ETFs, Popular Posts, Small Cap ETFs, Special Sectors ETFs, US Markets and ETFs | No Comments

If I had to identify a half-dozen of my favorite movies, The Shawshank Redemption would definitely make the cut. It may even be on your Top Five list. Why am I bringing it up? In essence, the film produced one of the more inspirational quotes in motion picture history. The hero pens a letter to his incarcerated friend and he included, “Remember, Red, hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things. And no good thing ever dies.” Ironically, hope is not particularly…

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You’re Gonna Pay How Much? Valuation Extremes Are No Longer ‘Justified’ By Ultra-Low Rates

By | Bond ETFs, Currency ETFs, Current Affairs and ETFs, Emerging Market ETFs, ETF Philosophy, ETF Strategy, Large Cap ETFs, Popular Posts, Small Cap ETFs, Special Sectors ETFs, US Markets and ETFs | No Comments

For several years, ultra-low interest rates “justified” paying higher stock prices for anemic earnings growth. The 10-year Treasury yield traded in a tight range between 2.0%-2.5%. Borrowing costs remained stable or continued to fall. Indeed, the notion that rates would remain extremely low for a very long time encouraged many to pony up for a price-to-earnings (P/E) multiple of 19. Throughout the first ten months of 2016, though, a sub-2% 10-year Treasury prompted investors to pay even higher equity valuations….

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Three Reasons Why The 30-Year Bond Bull Market Is Still Intact

By | Bond ETFs, Current Affairs and ETFs, ETF Philosophy, ETF Strategy, Global ETFs, International ETFs, Popular Posts, Special Sectors ETFs, US Markets and ETFs | No Comments

How quickly they forget. For 30 years, mainstream analysts have been declaring the end of the secular bull market in bonds. And for 30 years, they’ve been dead wrong. Consider the recent history of the economic recovery since the Great Recession. Specifically, bond yields spiked after the Federal Reserve wrapped up quantitative easing (QE) in the spring of 2010. Scores of analysts declared the end of the bond bull. Were they right? Hardly. Rates cratered alongside the Fed’s about-face on…

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Monster Stock Rally On A Clinton Victory? Don’t Bank On It

By | Bond ETFs, Current Affairs and ETFs, Dividend ETFs, ETF Philosophy, ETF Strategy, Large Cap ETFs, Popular Posts, US Markets and ETFs | No Comments

The S&P 500 fell approximately 3% over the course of nine days on election angst. The FBI’s decision to close the books on the Clinton private server investigation propelled the popular index toward reclaiming two-thirds of those losses (2%) during Monday’s session; it continued gaining ground in early Tuesday trading. Will the relief rally be meaningful? Will it help send stocks surging upward through the inauguration of the next president by the third week of January? Probably not. For one thing, the…

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Stock Market Anxiety? It’s Not Clinton-Trump, It’s The U.S. Federal Reserve

By | Current Affairs and ETFs, ETF Philosophy, ETF Strategy, Large Cap ETFs, Popular Posts, Small Cap ETFs, US Markets and ETFs | No Comments

The financial media rely heavily on advertising sales from financial firms. Conflict of interest? Possibly. If scores of folks make “risk-off” adjustments to portfolios such that the demand for riskier assets (e.g., stocks, low-grade corporate bonds, etc.) falls of a cliff, Wall Street corporations may lose hundreds of billions in asset management revenue. And if investment companies struggle, the financial media will see a sharp decline in the advertising dollars necessary to turn a profit. For the most part, then,…

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No Soup For You! Companies Will Slow Down Their Dividend Payouts And Stock Buybacks

By | Bond ETFs, Currency ETFs, Current Affairs and ETFs, Dividend ETFs, ETF Philosophy, ETF Strategy, Large Cap ETFs, Popular Posts, US Markets and ETFs | No Comments

Public companies seldom distribute more to shareholders than what they earn in a given year. It is categorically uncommon for those corporations to pay out more in dividends and share buybacks than what they earn for two years in a row. Three years? That’s never happened. Take a look at the total payout ratio dating back to 1964. The ratio (dividends + buybacks/corporate earnings) surpassed 100% for two consecutive years as the U.S. dealt with the early ’90s economic downturn…

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