Archive | Biotechnology ETFs

5 Huge Misunderstandings About The Current Investing Environment

Over the weekend, the Denver Broncos beat the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship. Popular football analysts had – across the board, it seemed – believed the Patriots were a “shoe-in.” They were wrong. Peyton Manning could still throw deep passes to score touchdowns. And Denver’s defense rattled Tom Brady on nearly every Patriot possession. [...] Continue Reading...


Asset Class Update: Is Diversification Still A Free Lunch?

According to Barry Ritholtz of Ritholtz Wealth Management, a frequent contributor to CNBC as well as Bloomberg, “the beauty of diversification is that it’s about as close as you can get to a free lunch in investing.” Since 2011, however, investors who diversified in stocks outside of the U.S. and who diversified across other asset [...] Continue Reading...


Why The U.S. Stock Market Never Completely Recovered

Some things go unnoticed. For example, the S&P 500 rallied 13% off its closing lows (1867) set in late August. Lost in the shuffle? The popular benchmark has yet to revisit its closing highs (2130) registered back in May. In essence, the corrective activity that began in the springtime as a function of a faltering [...] Continue Reading...


Our Current Asset Allocation For Moderate Growth and Income Clients

There were few investment professionals who believed in exchange-traded funds (ETFs) back in 1993. In fact, you could count the early adopters on your keyboard-using fingers. For example, my friend and money manager Tom Lydon used ETFs before he created ETF Trends. Dave Fry gathered a following at ETF Digest. And “yours truly?” I regularly [...] Continue Reading...


What Deleveraging May Mean For Netflix And Many Of Your Favorite Stocks

You know those annoying notifications that chime on your cell phone in the middle of the work day? The ones that sound off to let you know when Kim Kardashian’s daughter sits on a commode? Or when Donald Trump insults a member of the media? I get far too many of those. I’ve tried playing with the [...] Continue Reading...


What the 3rd Quarter Tells Us About The Stock Market In October

Three months ago to the day (6/30), I served up a list of reasons for lowering one’s exposure to riskier assets. I discussed weakness in market internals where fewer and fewer corporate components of the Dow and S&P 500 had been propping up the popular U.S. benchmarks. I talked about the faster rate of deterioration [...] Continue Reading...


Resilient Consumer? Not During The Manufacturing Retreat and Corporate Revenue Recession

Concerned investors started punishing foreign stocks and emerging market equities in May. The primary reason? Many feared the adverse effects of declining economic growth around the globe as well as the related declines in world trade. By June, risk-averse investors began selling U.S. high yield bonds as well as U.S. small cap assets. A significant [...] Continue Reading...


Why The S&P 500 Is Likely To Revisit The Correction Lows Near 1870

In Selling The Drama Or Buying The Rally (8/27), I delineated the way in which 10%-plus price corrections had unfolded under similar circumstances in history (e.g., 1998, 2010, 2011, etc.). Specifically, when the prospects for the global economy are deteriorating, U.S. stock benchmarks typically reclaim about one-half of their losses on “hope rallies.” Afterwards, they retest [...] Continue Reading...


The Stock Market’s Best Shot? A Fed Promise To Move Slower Than A Three-Toed Sloth

Consumers, as opposed to manufacturers, represent two-thirds of the U.S. economy. Indeed, Americans love to splurge. We buy sneakers, iPhones, home furnishings, real estate, cars, jewelry, concert tickets, and meals at our favorite restaurants. We even buy chew toys for our pets. Many of us, however, do not have enough cash saved up to acquire [...] Continue Reading...


This Is What Happens When The Fed Tries To Leave ‘QE’

Back on October 29, 2014, the Federal Reserve ended its largest round of quantitative easing (QE3/QE4). The unconventional policy of buying market-based assets with electronically created credits (dollars) first began in late November of 2008. Since that time, $3.75 trillion in stimulus forced interest rates downward and sent stock prices soaring. The S&P 500 moved from [...] Continue Reading...


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